PN Review Print and Online Poetry Magazine
News and Notes
Digital Access to PN Review
Access the latest issues, plus back issues of PN Review with Exact Editions For PN Review subscribers: access the PN Review digital archive via the Exact Editions app Exactly or the Exact Editions website, you will first need to know your PN Review ID number. read more
Most Read... Rebecca WattsThe Cult of the Noble Amateur
(PN Review 239)
Eavan BolandA Lyric Voice at Bay
(PN Review 121)
Mark FordLetters And So It Goes
Letters from Young Mr Grace
(aka John Ashbery)

(PN Review 239)
Henry Kingon Toby Martinez de las Rivas
(PN Review 244)
Vahni CapildeoOn Judging Prizes, & Reading More than Six Really Good Books
(PN Review 237)
Jamie OsbornIn conversation with Sasha Dugdale
(PN Review 240)
Poems Articles Interviews Reports Reviews Contributors
Gratis Ad 1
Monthly Carcanet Books
Next Issue Sasha Dugdale On Vision Yehuda Amichai's Blessing Chris Miller on Alvin Feinman Rebecca Watts Blue Period and other poems Patrick McGuinness's Mother as Spy

This report is taken from PN Review 219, Volume 41 Number 1, September - October 2014.

Letter from Wales Sam Adams
Meic Stephens’ splendid biography, Rhys Davies – A Writer’s Life is shortlisted in the creative non-fiction category for Wales Book of the Year 2013, the winner to be declared at a ceremony in Caernarfon in July. The book is the summation of many years’ study of Rhys Davies as author and service to the charitable Trust set up in his name through the philanthropy of his brother Lewis. Meic brought to the task of biographer unprecedented access to the materials of a life dedicated to writing, lived simply and, to a large extent, secretively. He also brought a knowledge of the history, the character – and the characters – of the south Wales valleys, the source of much of the best of Rhys Davies’s writing. He was, as they say, cut out for the job, and he has done it exceedingly well.

In 1969, Davies published Print of a Hare’s Foot – An Autobiographical Beginning. It is a typically fluent and entertaining account of his life as he sped, light-footed as a hare, to and fro between Blaenclydach and London (the former to recharge batteries with the stuff of valleys life, and his pockets with the wherewithal to maintain existence in the latter), leaving hardly a sign of his passing, for he travelled light and had no interest in personal space or possessions. The second part of the book describes travels farther afield, notably to the south of France and into the orbit of D.H. Lawrence. He was a staunch friend to Lawrence in his later years when ...


Searching, please wait... animated waiting image