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Welcome to PN Review, one of the outstanding literary magazines of our time. Keep up with the many worlds of poetry in this independent and always stimulating journal. For four decades PN Review has been a place to discover new poems in English and in translation as well as interviews, news, essays, reviews and reports from around the world. Subscribers can explore the complete, uniquely rich digital archive.

A PN Review subscription makes an excellent gift, with a new magazine every two months and full access to the archive. Reduced rates are available for students; gift subscriptions to students are available at student rate.

Featured Interview
In Conversation with Paul Muldoon Adam Crothers This conversation with Paul Muldoon took place on a crisp morning in January 2015, shortly after the publication of his collection One Thousand Things Worth Knowing. He was in Cambridge to deliver the Clark Lectures on ‘Yeats and the Afterlife’; we spoke for an hour at Trinity College, in a spartan guest room livened by a few books and, on the coffee table between us, a fuchsia orchid.

ADAM CROTHERS: When I told a friend that your new book was called One Thousand Things Worth Knowing, he said ‘Oh, does this mean he’s finally going to tell us something useful?

PAUL MULDOON: Well, of course, that’s an interesting response. I’m not sure if your friend generally looks to poetry for telling us some things that are useful…?

Do you think many people do?

I think many ... read more
Bach in Autumn, translated by Marilyn Hacker
Translated from the French by Marilyn Hacker
Jean-Paul de Dadelsen I

The Jews this evening, under the lindens, near the ramparts, taking care
Not to exceed the Sabbath mile, are promenading their black hats.
Brothers of Elijah and Nabaoth, peace be with you!
Last of the ancient days, Saturday stretches out in the distancing sun.
It’s the day when the earth, even beneath October’s harrow, recalls
That it once bore in its womb soaked with funereal sweetness
            The Body of the Son of Man.

In the church, women are mopping the tiles. Later
They will go home to sweep in front of their doorsteps and will fill with oil
            The lamp of the seventh day.
We are born to bear time, not to elude it,
... read more
The Evolution of Irish Poetry
John McAuliffe I. A Century of Silence?

Books about Irish poetry are rarer than you might think. Thomas Kinsella’s defining essay, The Dual Tradition, described the subject as ‘gapped and discontinuous’, an argument he put even more strongly when he wrote: ‘The inheritance [of Gaelic poetry] is certainly mine but only at two enormous removes – across a century’s silence and through an exchange of worlds.’ Slowly, the silence of Kinsella’s imagined nineteenth century has begun to give way. Out of the echo chamber of university departments, a different and noisier literature is emerging, as is a new way of thinking about the continuities in Irish poetry across the centuries.

The central figure in those arguments is W.B. Yeats, and one of the most interesting developments has been the way in which his ‘Anglo-Irish’ work has been folded back into a single, more broadly ... read more
Selected from the Archive...
Lessing on Ghosts Idris Parry
Gotthold Ephraim Lessing died just two hundred years ago, in 1781. He is generally regarded as one of the most important figures in German literature. Writers since his time, from Goethe to Thomas Mann, have talked with admiration and gratitude about the man and his work. The word that crops up again and again is 'character'. Plenty of people are just as learned and cultivated as Lessing, said Goethe to Eckermann in 1825, 'but where do we find such character?' What we know of his life and what we read of his writings tell us this was an honest man, a fearless man, prepared to defend without compromise opinions arrived at through unprejudiced thought, however unpopular these opinions might be. His prose is as clear as his thought and as bold as his character.

Lessing was born ... read more
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