PN Review Online Poetry Literary Magazine
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David Herdin Conversation with John Ashbery
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Peter Rileyon Ted Berrigan
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Welcome to PN Review, one of the outstanding literary magazines of our time.
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Featured Article Picture of Elaine Feinstein
Forms of Self-Exposure Elaine Feinstein There have always been women poets, and their themes and passions have been as various as the cultures in which they wrote. So I am not seeking to describe the nature of poetry written by women in general.

However, I have lived through a half-century in which the status of women poets has changed out of all recognition. In Britain fifty years ago we might have been caricatured as spinsterish, faintly comic. Women poets now have a place in the public world – they are Professors of Poetry in great institutions and indeed the three present Poets Laureate in these islands are all women. The genders which seemed so immutable in the post-war world have slipped and shifted. My question this morning is this: Has the entry of so many fresh voices into the art significantly changed the nature and form of poetry ... read more
Quality and Width
The Penguin Book of Russian Poetry, edited by Robert Chandler, Boris Dralyuk and Irina Mashinski (Penguin) £12.99
This extraordinary anthology has no precedent or peer. Previously, when sympathy for Russia was strong enough to provide publishers with an incentive, for instance during World War II, anthologies of Russian poetry in English translation were assembled. But none of them provided much more than a meagre random selection and, with very few exceptions, such as the Frances Cornford and Esther Polianowsky Salaman collection of 1943, were the translations good enough to stand as poems in their own right. It is ironic that, finally, a comprehensive collection of fine, often extraordinarily fine, translations, with accurate and acute background and critical information, should appear when Russia and all it produces probably appeals to the Western public less than at any time over the last two hundred years.

How is the appearance of The Penguin Book of Russian Poetry, covering 250 ... read more
Elegy for the Family Romance
Nausheen Eusuf for Sohana Manzoor

1. Elegy for my mother, still alive,

so fearful that she tracks an airplane’s progress
for hours across a screen when her children travel,
intent on a small green dot as if their lives
depended on it. She’d like to clutch them close,
to keep them locked and safe in a wooden chest
with a clasp that buckles shut, nice and snug.
It’s up to her now, even though she knows
her husband’s dementia is a sham. He fakes it
... read more
Selected from the Archive...
In Conversation with Steven Matthews Les Murray
This conversation took place in Oxford on 1 July 1998, the day of the publication in book form of Les Murray's verse novel Fredy Neptune.

STEVEN MATTHEWS: The novel is very much a parable of the first half of this century, following Fredy's life from his experiences in the First World War through the Second World War and beyond. How much do you feel that those events early in the century overshadow the latter part of it?

LES MURRAY: It's very much on our conscience that such tremendous slaughter should have been carried out. There are two major slaughters of the twentieth century which we admit and two which we still deny. The First World War is a slaughter which we admit and so is he Second World War including the holocaust. We ... read more
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