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Readers are asked to send a note of any misprints or mistakes that they spot in this item to editor@pnreview.co.uk

This item is taken from Poetry Nation 1 Number 1, 1973.

Contributors Notes
'The Way In' is the title poem of CHARLES T0MLIN50N's new collection, shortly to be published by Oxford University Press.

PETER SCUPHAM'S The Snowing Globe (Peterloo Poets) appeared in 1972, and The Gift (Keepsake Press) was published in 1973, illustrated by Anthea Lawrence.

PETER HUCHEL, whose work appeared in Michael Hamburger's East German Poetry (Carcanet, 1972), will publish his Selected Poems, in dual-language format, with Michael Hamburger's translations, in 1974 (Carcanet).

JONATHAN GALASSI is an American poet, until recently a Marshall Scholar at Cambridge; he is a contributor to the anthology Ten American Poets (Carcanet).

DONALD DAVIE's Collected Poems and Thomas Hardy and British Poetry (Routledge) will be reviewed in Poetry Nation II.

ROGER GARFITT will publish his first full length collection of poems with Carcanet in 1974; he is a regular contributor to the London Magazine and other periodicals.

ROBERT B. SHAW, editor of American Poetry Since 1960 (Carcanet), has published two collections of poems in the UK.

ELIZABETH JENNINGS' most recent collection, Relationships (Macmillan), will soon be followed by a new volume.

DAVID DAY recently published Brass Rubbing with the Cellar Press; the full 'Brass Rubbing' sequence and others of his poems will be published in 1975 (Carcanet).

DOUGLAS DUNN'S most recent collection is The Happier Life (Faber); he is editing New Irish Writing with Michael Schmidt (Carcanet) and preparing a new collection of poems.

COLIN FALCK'S collection of poems, Backwards into the Smoke, was published recently (Carcanet); he is co-editor of the Review.

MOLLY HOLDEN'S two collections are To Make Me Grieve and Air and Chill Earth (Chatto).

JAMES ATLAS, until recently a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford, is now free-lance, the editor of Ten American Poets (Carcanet).

ROBERT NYE's 'Prologue' (p. 32) is to The Seven Deadly Sins, commissioned for the Stirling Festival and given its premiere performance in the Church of the Holy Rude, Stirling, in May 1973, with music by James Douglas and masks by Aileen Campbell; the complete text will be published in book form by Omphalos Press.

GREVEL LINDOP, co-editor of British Poetry Since 1960 (Carcanet) was included in the anthology Faber Introduction II.

FLEUR ADCOCK's collections include Tigers and High Tide in the Garden (Oxford University Press).

GEORGE BUCHANAN, whose most recent collection, Minute-book of a City (Carcanet), appeared in 1972, recently published a new novel, Naked Reason, in the United States.

MICHAEL HAMBURGER's Ownerless Earth: new and selected poems, East German Poetry, and A Mug's Game: intermittent memoirs, were recently published by Carcanet.

VAL WARNER'S first book of poems, Under the Penthouse (Carcanet) will be followed shortly by The Centenary Corbière, an extensive dual language presentation of Corbière's poems and prose.

C. H. SISSON's Collected Poems and Selected Translations will appear early in 1974, under the title In the Trojan Ditch (Carcanet).

TERRY EAGLETON is Fellow of English at Wadham College, Oxford; his most recent critical book is Exiles and Emigrès (Chatto).

ALAN YOUNG has been researching into Dada and Surrealism and their effect on British literature.

ADRIAN STOKES, the painter, poet and critic who died in 1972, left at his death a collection of essays entitled A Game that must be Lost, the distillation of his beliefs about art and psychology; the essay printed here is central to the book (Carcanet).

DAMIAN GRANT is a lecturer in English at Manchester University; his poems and reviews have appeared in various periodicals.

This item is taken from Poetry Nation 1 Number 1, 1973.



Readers are asked to send a note of any misprints or mistakes that they spot in this item to editor@pnreview.co.uk
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