PN Review Print and Online Poetry Magazine
Most Read... Rebecca WattsThe Cult of the Noble Amateur
(PN Review 239)
Mark FordLetters And So It Goes
Letters from Young Mr Grace
(aka John Ashbery)

(PN Review 239)
Henry Kingon Toby Martinez de las Rivas
(PN Review 244)
Eavan BolandA Lyric Voice at Bay
(PN Review 121)
Vahni CapildeoOn Judging Prizes, & Reading More than Six Really Good Books
(PN Review 237)
Jamie OsbornIn conversation with Sasha Dugdale
(PN Review 240)
Poems Articles Interviews Reports Reviews Contributors
PN Review Blog
Monthly Carcanet Books
Next Issue Vahni Capildeo The Boisterous Weeping of Margery Kempe Paul Muldoon The Fly Sinead Morrissey Put Off That Mask Jane Yeh Three Poems Sarah Rothenberg Poetry and Music: Exile and Return

This report is taken from PN Review 92, Volume 19 Number 6, July - August 1993.

Good Eggs, George Moore and the Motor car A.V. Beedell
The mad woman next door, Lydia, always keeps a row of eggs well past their sell-by-date on her window sill just in case on the beat of a butterfly's wings (which is all it takes), the demented shriek of a car alarm should happen, within her range, to break what's left of the urban peace. Living in the centre of London, she has developed quite a good elbow.

Motor-bike couriers, pizza deliveries, and post office vans are, hypothetically, also on Lydia's hit list but as far as I know she has not yet managed to make an egg, not even hard-boiled, travel at the speed of light. I suspect she'd very much like to.

But my own maniacal, if less athletic loathing for the internal combustion engine and all its attendant cacophonies was subverted a little time ago by the ostentatiously anti-p.c. (politically correct) suggestion that the racket in London had in all probability been worse before the advent of the infernal machine. Fortunately for my m.o. (moral outrage), some recent research into 'noise' files at the Public Record Office would seem, however, to reject this flippant exercise in contumelious r.d. (rational discourse).

But some things it must be said, never change. A 1911 Home Office file on traffic noise (HO45/13306/204355) included a letter to The Times of 8 August, which had this to say concerning a favourite institution.
 
Then there is the Post Office, always an incorrigible offender, not only because ...


Searching, please wait... animated waiting image