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This poem is taken from PN Review 125, Volume 25 Number 3, January - February 1999.

Three Poems Emma Lew

Red

Leagues apart, and in what latitudes together,
in the most forlorn regions of the oceanic city,
and here moving softly through the listening crowd,
we came and we came and we left our machines
at night, and everywhere hidden wires had only
to be touched. Class hatred had then just dawned.
Cables of denial sped. I remember how the tolling
of a bell would flood, the insurrection surely
cutting my face. Some high official was thrown
into the river, and this became the meshing
of the wheels, and when lightning struck that part
of the old palace, all the theatres were deceived,
or deceived themselves. We were the hired
and the depraved, thin and dark and unjust,
prepared to burst in that ray of light when it came,
hearing nothing and scribbling until the stupid lamp
...


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