PN Review Online Poetry Literary Magazine
Most Read... Daniel Kaneon Ted Berrigan
(PN Review 169)
David Herdin Conversation with John Ashbery
(PN Review 99)
Henry Kingon Geoffrey Hill's Oraclau/Oracles
(PN Review 199)
Dannie Abse'In Highgate Woods' and Other Poems
(PN Review 209)
Poems Articles Interviews Reports Reviews Contributors
Next Issue Remembering Christopher Middleton Poems by Sheenagh Pugh Peter Huchel, the Jewish Cemetery at Sulzburg He Alone Shall be Called Weather by Caoilinn Hughes Rebecca Watts on Stevie Smith
Welcome to PN Review, one of the outstanding literary magazines of our time.
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Featured Poem
‘Largesse’ and other poems Thomas McCarthy Largesse

I’ve been thinking of my mother’s life, the sheer audacity
Of her kindness, of her unbridled largesse. She who had
Nothing or little to give gave more than the shirt off her back,
Gave the skin of her hands to break wet firewood in a hard frost
During the long winter of 1962/63. The long winter settled
Across her shoulders as an oxen-yoke of pain. The hard facts
Of Irish life distilled what was left of my mother’s lost poetry;
Blackbirds pitied her in her Council terrace, came for crumbs
That would give them stomach pains of frost. The proud
... read more
Bush Notes: 19 October 2015
Kirsty Gunn Here are some words I’ve been writing down recently: Mingimingi. Ponga. Horoeka. Titoki.

They are very busy, these words, doing more than describing what they stand for – various plants and bushes and trees that make up the vegetation of New Zealand – for they are also busy being those strange far away leaves and twigs and branches on the page. Miro. Rewarewa. How strange they are for me to write, these words packed and alive with consonants, each with its own shape, both closed and open-mouthed. Say Whauwhau – an unknown form upon the page.

Years ago, I wrote – not a poem, for I am not a poet – one of my ‘things’, as I call the short poem-like items that sometimes appear in my work, called ‘Ngaio’. It was in a collection called 44 Things and now I see that the ... read more
Conversations with Poetry Micro-publishers (2) Peter Foolen Editions
Luke Allan Peter Foolen Editions, based in Eindhoven, publishes work by contemporary poets and artists. There is a focus on collaborative work, multimedia pieces, and project-based publications. As well as books, the press publishes poem-objects (flags, toys, etc), prints, and portfolios (boxed suites of work by one artist or a collaboration). Poetry is given a generous remit of allowable forms and guises, and the books and objects are finished to a particularly  high standard. I spoke to Peter by email.

When and where did you start publishing?
Who and what prompted you?

My history as a publisher goes back to 1987. Having worked for a few years as an artist alone in my studio, that year I joined the artist-run space ‘Peninsula’ in Eindhoven. Over the next decade I organized, with my partners there, some hundred in-house exhibitions. I designed the invitation cards and printed, silkscreen, the posters for each ... read more
Selected from the Archive...
In Conversation with Steven Matthews Les Murray
This conversation took place in Oxford on 1 July 1998, the day of the publication in book form of Les Murray's verse novel Fredy Neptune.

STEVEN MATTHEWS: The novel is very much a parable of the first half of this century, following Fredy's life from his experiences in the First World War through the Second World War and beyond. How much do you feel that those events early in the century overshadow the latter part of it?

LES MURRAY: It's very much on our conscience that such tremendous slaughter should have been carried out. There are two major slaughters of the twentieth century which we admit and two which we still deny. The First World War is a slaughter which we admit and so is he Second World War including the holocaust. We ... read more
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