PN Review Online Poetry Literary Magazine
News and Notes
Join our PN Review Relaunch Party in Manchester
Join us to celebrate the relaunch of PN Review and our beautiful new redesign on Thursday 8th October from 7pm at Chapter One Bookshop, Lever Street, Manchester. read more
Most Read... Peter Rileyon Ted Berrigan
(PN Review 169)
David Herdin Conversation with John Ashbery
(PN Review 99)
Henry Kingon Geoffrey Hill's Oraclau/Oracles
(PN Review 199)
Dannie Abse'In Highgate Woods' and Other Poems
(PN Review 209)
Poems Articles Interviews Reports Reviews Contributors
Next Issue Gregory O’Brien In defence of poetry as an offshore island and art as an undersea mammal or coral reef John Ashbery The Heavy Bear: Delmore Schwartz’s Life Versus his Poetry (1995) Mary Maxwell The Way Grass Grows: Janice Biala, Ford, and Pound’s Pisan Cantos Yves Bonnefoy The Tombs of Ravenna David Hoak Proofs of Love: the last letters of Lota de Macedo Soares to Elizabeth Bishop
Welcome to PN Review, one of the outstanding literary magazines of our time.
Keep up with the many worlds of poetry in this independent and always stimulating journal. For four decades PN Review has been a place to discover new poems in English and in translation as well as interviews, news, essays, reviews and reports from around the world. Subscribers can explore the complete, uniquely rich digital archive.

PN Review subscription makes an excellent gift, with a new magazine every two months and full access to the archive. Reduced rates are available for students; gift subscriptions to students are available at student rate.

Submissions to PN Review: Current subscribers may submit work by e-mail (word attachment). All other submissions should be made by post to: The Editors, PN Review, 4th Floor, Alliance House, 30 Cross Street, Manchester M2 7AQ, UK. Submissions should be accompanied by a self-addressed return envelope.

Featured Article
Aurelia: Art and Literature through the Mouth of the Fairy Tale Carol Mavor My forthcoming book, Aurelia: Art and Literature Through the Mouth of the Fairy Tale, to be published by Reaktion Books in 2016, is told with a butterfly tongue that celebrates, warns, swallows, chews and rebels. Aurelia awakens the fairy tale realm in a wide-range of authors, artists, books and objects who fall down its hole. Beyond the expected Brothers Grimm and Lewis Carroll, there are more surprising inclusions: like the gold of Ovid’s Midas; the magical materiality of glass; the real and imagined beasts of a medieval manuscript [below] ; the tragic candyland of the 1950s child-poet Minou Drouet; and the Ice Age’s ivory sculpture known as the Lion Man of the Hohlenstein Stadel.

Swallowtail Butterfly, Nicholas of Lyra's Commentary on the Bible

What follows are three Aurelian specimens: one gold; one red; and one brown. First is a chrysalis of the book’s golden introduction, ... read more
Tales from Shakespeare
John Ashbery It seemed like a huge part of our lives
revolved around the woodpile, all buzz
and splatter one minute, low wigwams the next.

He made a horse, like what was on the farm
at which end of the store they let
the young men practice. (The others dress funny.)
Kids used to hang around, queering the pitch for

the vanilla tower

following its pipsqueak editor out
into the brilliant day, of casings, undeliverable, unprogrammed
... read more
Home in Wandsworth
Home Various Writers
OFF_PRESS/Safe Ground, 2015 (173pp)

You were silly like us; your gift survived it all:
The parish of rich women, physical decay,
Yourself. Mad Ireland hurt you into poetry.
Now Ireland has her madness and her weather still,
For poetry makes nothing happen: it survives
In the valley of its making where executives
Would never want to tamper, flows on south
From ranches of isolation and the busy griefs,
Raw towns that we believe and die in; it survives,
A way of happening, a mouth.

(from W. H. Auden, ‘In Memory of W. B. Yeats’ (1940), section II)

When Auden’s elegy in memory of Yeats is brought to mind I suppose most of us remember Auden’s assertion that ‘poetry makes nothing happen’. It’s a heavily-qualified assertion – five lines later the poet conceives of verse-making ... read more
Selected from the Archive...
In Conversation with Steven Matthews Les Murray
This conversation took place in Oxford on 1 July 1998, the day of the publication in book form of Les Murray's verse novel Fredy Neptune.

STEVEN MATTHEWS: The novel is very much a parable of the first half of this century, following Fredy's life from his experiences in the First World War through the Second World War and beyond. How much do you feel that those events early in the century overshadow the latter part of it?

LES MURRAY: It's very much on our conscience that such tremendous slaughter should have been carried out. There are two major slaughters of the twentieth century which we admit and two which we still deny. The First World War is a slaughter which we admit and so is he Second World War including the holocaust. We ... read more
Searching, please wait... animated waiting image