PN Review Print and Online Poetry Magazine
News and Notes
PN Review Prize winners announced
Carcanet Press and PN Review are delighted to announce the winners of the first ever PN Review Prize. read more
Most Read... Drew MilneTom Raworth’s Writing
‘present past improved’: Tom Raworth’s Writing

(PN Review 236)
Vahni CapildeoOn Judging Prizes, & Reading More than Six Really Good Books
(PN Review 237)
Alejandro Fernandez-OsorioPomace (trans. James Womack)
(PN Review 236)
Kei MillerIn the Shadow of Derek Walcott
1930–2017

(PN Review 235)
Kate BinghamPuddle
(PN Review 236)
Eavan BolandA Lyric Voice at Bay
(PN Review 121)
Poems Articles Interviews Reports Reviews Contributors
Gratis Ad 1
Gratis Ad 2
Next Issue CELEBRATING JOHN ASHBERY Contributors include Mark Ford, Marina Warner, Jeremy Over, Theophilus Kwek, Sam Riviere, Luke Kennard, Philip Terry,Agnes Lehoczky, Emily Critchley, Oli Hazard and others Miles Champion The Gold Standard Rebecca Watts The Cult of the Noble Amateur Marina Tsvetaeva ‘My desire has the features of a woman’: Two Letters translated by Christopher Whyte Iain Bamforth Black and White
Readers are asked to send a note of any misprints or mistakes that they spot in this item to editor@pnreview.co.uk

This item is taken from PN Review 204, Volume 38 Number 4, March - April 2012.

INSIDE COVER: Stella Halkyard Pictures from a Library Christina Rossetti CHRISTINA ROSSETTI
How public like a frog': a portrait of Christina Rossetti
Photographic portrait of Christina Rossetti by Elliott and Fry, albumen print for carte de visite, c. 1870s, 2⅛" X 3½". Reproduced by courtesy of the University Librarian and Director, The John Rylands Library, The University of Manchester.

'How public like a frog': a portrait of Christina Rossetti

It is Christina Rossetti who looks out at us from this photograph by Elliott and Fry - a carte de visite recently discovered hidden amongst the pages of a book of her poetry, A Pageant and other poems, in the John Rylands Library, Manchester.

The only Sister of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, Rossetti sought obscurity for many years, though she couldn't help illuminating this with her poetry. In 1875 she inexplicably succumbed to the pressures of celebrity portraiture. So here she sits, in middle age, holding a book which I imagine is a book of verse: 'Yes,' she seems to say, 'I am a poet... all I care for you to know is here. Behold this green volume. It is a copy of my collected works. It costs four shillings and sixpence. Read That.'

STELLA HALKYARD




This item is taken from PN Review 204, Volume 38 Number 4, March - April 2012.



Readers are asked to send a note of any misprints or mistakes that they spot in this item to editor@pnreview.co.uk
Searching, please wait... animated waiting image