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This item is taken from PN Review 234, Volume 43 Number 4, March - April 2017.

Letters
JOSHUA WEINER WRITES:


I was pleased to read Andrew Latimer’s essay ‘Poetry for the Future: Thom Gunn and the Legacy of Poetry’ [PNR 233], especially because the poem in question, ‘Misanthropos’, had such an important role to play in the development of Gunn’s thinking about poetic form and his own ambitions for what poetry could do, or should at least try to do.  The implications very much concern poetry’s future, as Latimer boldly announces. Readers who are interested in a longer consideration of what the archive reveals about that poem might find my essay on it useful – it can be found in At the Barriers: On the Poetry of Thom Gunn (Chicago, 2009), the book of essays by various hands that launched the web exhibition cited in Latimer’s fine essay.  

This item is taken from PN Review 234, Volume 43 Number 4, March - April 2017.



Readers are asked to send a note of any misprints or mistakes that they spot in this item to editor@pnreview.co.uk
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