PN Review Print and Online Poetry Magazine
Most Read... Drew MilneTom Raworth’s Writing
‘present past improved’: Tom Raworth’s Writing

(PN Review 236)
Vahni CapildeoOn Judging Prizes, & Reading More than Six Really Good Books
(PN Review 237)
Alejandro Fernandez-OsorioPomace (trans. James Womack)
(PN Review 236)
Kei MillerIn the Shadow of Derek Walcott
1930–2017

(PN Review 235)
Kate BinghamPuddle
(PN Review 236)
Eavan BolandA Lyric Voice at Bay
(PN Review 121)
Poems Articles Interviews Reports Reviews Contributors
Gratis Ad 1
Gratis Ad 2
Next Issue Michelle Holmes on ‘Whitman, Alabama’ Les Murray Eight Poems Gabriel Josipovici Who Dares Wins: Reflections on Translation Maureen N. McLane Four Poems James Womack Europe (after the German of Marie Luise Kaschnitz)
Readers are asked to send a note of any misprints or mistakes that they spot in this item to editor@pnreview.co.uk

This item is taken from PN Review 203, Volume 38 Number 3, January - February 2012.

Inside cover Portrait: David C. Ward on Marianne Moore
Marianne Moore Portrait by George Platt Lynes

MARIANNE MOORE
by George Platt Lynes
Gelatin silver print, 1935
23.4cm x 19cm (9316" x 712"),
Image National Portrait Gallery,
Smithsonian Institution
© Estate of George Platt Lynes
NPG.89.89

Marianne Moore (1887-1972)
Prior to Marianne Moore, women poets were outliers in the American poetical tradition. Emily Dickinson was too singular and hermetic - as well as unknown - to leave any traces. Poets such as H.D. were known and respected up to a point, but were still considered marginal or even anomalous by the literary establishment. Marianne Moore changed all that. She wrote poetry that was wholly original and could not be condescendingly damned with faint praise. And she influenced subsequent poets, especially Elizabeth Bishop. Poetically, she more than fulfilled Pound's edict to 'make it new', concocting new verse forms - a line that seemed like prose but wasn't, based, in part, on counting syllables - which she married to her close empirical observation. In her 'manifesto' poem, titled 'Poetry', she begins: 'I, too, dislike it: there are things that are important beyond all this fiddle. / Reading it, however, with a perfect contempt for it, one discovers in / it after all, a place for the genuine'. She loved observing animals, especially at the zoo. And she was a devoted baseball fan, an unlikely afficion for a modernist poet. She also became a charismatic figure at readings and literary gatherings, standing out with her distinctive tricorne hat. But her influence as a writer made her a trailblazer both in and of herself and for what came after her, with the growing presence of women poets in American literature.

DAVID C. WARD

This item is taken from PN Review 203, Volume 38 Number 3, January - February 2012.



Readers are asked to send a note of any misprints or mistakes that they spot in this item to editor@pnreview.co.uk
Searching, please wait... animated waiting image