PN Review Print and Online Poetry Magazine
News and Notes
PN Review Prize winners announced
Carcanet Press and PN Review are delighted to announce the winners of the first ever PN Review Prize. read more
Most Read... Drew MilneTom Raworth’s Writing
‘present past improved’: Tom Raworth’s Writing

(PN Review 236)
Vahni CapildeoOn Judging Prizes, & Reading More than Six Really Good Books
(PN Review 237)
Alejandro Fernandez-OsorioPomace (trans. James Womack)
(PN Review 236)
Kei MillerIn the Shadow of Derek Walcott
1930–2017

(PN Review 235)
Kate BinghamPuddle
(PN Review 236)
Eavan BolandA Lyric Voice at Bay
(PN Review 121)
Poems Articles Interviews Reports Reviews Contributors
Gratis Ad 1
Gratis Ad 2
Next Issue CELEBRATING JOHN ASHBERY Contributors include Mark Ford, Marina Warner, Jeremy Over, Theophilus Kwek, Sam Riviere, Luke Kennard, Philip Terry,Agnes Lehoczky, Emily Critchley, Oli Hazard and others Miles Champion The Gold Standard Rebecca Watts The Cult of the Noble Amateur Marina Tsvetaeva ‘My desire has the features of a woman’: Two Letters translated by Christopher Whyte Iain Bamforth Black and White

This article is taken from PN Review 55, Volume 13 Number 5, May - June 1987.

The Etiquette of Taxi Rides John Ash
 
Above New York a sky full of buxom clouds and brilliant shafts of sunlight suggested a depopulated Tiepolo.

Far below, Mr Gondophares' flecked, grey eyes flitted to the meter as another luminous digit flashed into place. 'A couple of thousand dollars more and we'll be there,' he indifferently mused. In many ways the dullest, and therefore, in the eyes of public, the most enigmatic of New York's colony of the Very Rich, Mr Gondophares spent the greater part of his waking hours travelling the city's congested avenues in taxis. He could have used any of a fleet of a dozen or so automobiles haphazardly acquired over the years, but chose not to do so, and as a consequence had become accustomed to reckoning the time according to the figures clocked up above the cab-driver's seat. His belated appearances at the few social functions he still attended caused no offence but rather confirmed him in the eyes of Society as one of those whose fabulous wealth leant their every whim and waywardness the inarguable rightness of a natural law. The sheepish grin that became fixed on his face whenever he found himself confronted by a large and glittering social throng was generally considered a sign of his great cunning. In truth it represented something approaching terror.

Mr Gondophares was not a man who would knowingly upset expectations. His unconventionality was entirely conventional. He knew that his numerous employees would have been scandalized if they had discovered ...


Searching, please wait... animated waiting image