PN Review Print and Online Poetry Magazine
News and Notes
PN Review Prize winners announced
Carcanet Press and PN Review are delighted to announce the winners of the first ever PN Review Prize. read more
Most Read... Drew MilneTom Raworth’s Writing
‘present past improved’: Tom Raworth’s Writing

(PN Review 236)
Vahni CapildeoOn Judging Prizes, & Reading More than Six Really Good Books
(PN Review 237)
Alejandro Fernandez-OsorioPomace (trans. James Womack)
(PN Review 236)
Kei MillerIn the Shadow of Derek Walcott
1930–2017

(PN Review 235)
Kate BinghamPuddle
(PN Review 236)
Eavan BolandA Lyric Voice at Bay
(PN Review 121)
Poems Articles Interviews Reports Reviews Contributors
Gratis Ad 1
Gratis Ad 2
Next Issue CELEBRATING JOHN ASHBERY Contributors include Mark Ford, Marina Warner, Jeremy Over, Theophilus Kwek, Sam Riviere, Luke Kennard, Philip Terry,Agnes Lehoczky, Emily Critchley, Oli Hazard and others Miles Champion The Gold Standard Rebecca Watts The Cult of the Noble Amateur Marina Tsvetaeva ‘My desire has the features of a woman’: Two Letters translated by Christopher Whyte Iain Bamforth Black and White

This report is taken from PN Review 75, Volume 17 Number 1, September - October 1990.

Henry Brulard Alive and Well David Arkell
At seven on a summer morning the birds line up on the top rail of the Nouvelles Galeries. Already the waiters are putting out tables in front of the Cintra brasserie. (This is the Place Grenette in Stendhal's Grenoble.) Cleaning vehicles are sucking up rubbish from the night before, brushing and polishing the patterned streets. Apart from the odd van delivering bread, and a snake-like tram picking up people for work, there is no traffic. This is a carless zone and the streets have level wall-to-wall paving.

From my room at the top of the Hôtel de l'Europe I look down on the Place Grenette as from the topmost balcony of a theatre. At the far end I can see the monumental fountain which has been making such a deafening noise all night, like the waves of some gigantic sea - and behind it an elegant white building, three storeys high and five bays wide: Stendhal's house. As a mighty backdrop looms the friendly shape of Mont Saint-Eynard, part of the Massif de la Chartreuse.

Leaning on the balcony rail, I wait for breakfast. The shop below Stendhal's house bears the name RAYMOND CHRISTIAN in huge letters. It is a shoe shop. To pass the time I identify the second-floor windows of the hated Aunt Séraphie and the beloved Aunt Elisabeth - and those steps in the corner which the bayoneted man slowly mounted. (It was in the early days of the French Revolution and, when he ...


Searching, please wait... animated waiting image