PN Review Print and Online Poetry Magazine
News and Notes
The PN Review Prize 2017 - Now Open!
Most Read... Kei MillerIn the Shadow of Derek Walcott
1930–2017

(PN Review 235)
Alejandro Fernandez-OsorioPomace (trans. James Womack)
(PN Review 236)
Drew MilneTom Raworth’s Writing
‘present past improved’: Tom Raworth’s Writing

(PN Review 236)
Kate BinghamPuddle
(PN Review 236)
Eavan BolandA Lyric Voice at Bay
(PN Review 121)
Daniel Kaneon Ted Berrigan
(PN Review 169)
Poems Articles Interviews Reports Reviews Contributors
Gratis Ad 1
Gratis Ad 2
Next Issue Meet Michael Edwards at the Brasserie Lipp David Herman reads Milosz's life Sumita Chakraborty's five poems Judith Wilson's encounter with Giovanni Pascoli Simon Armitage revives Branwell Bronte

This review is taken from PN Review 91, Volume 19 Number 5, May - June 1993.

KINDS OF CORRECTNESS John Adlard, Songs for Dobra (Tuba Press) £5.40 pb
Fred Beake, The Whiteness of Her Becoming (University of Salzburg) £6.50 pb
Neil Curry, Walking To Santiago (Enitharmon) £7.95 pb
Peter Dent, Northwoods (Taxus) £5.95 pb
Leah Fritz, Somewhere En Route: Poems 1987-1992 (Loxwood Stoneleigh) £5.95 pb
Hepworth: a celebration, edited by David Woolley (Westwords) £4.50 pb
Rupert M. Loydell, Between Dark Dreams (Acumen Publications) £4.95 pb
Judith Kazantzis, The Rabbit Magician Plate (Sinclair Stevenson) £7.99 pb
Robert Pollet, Poetical Works (presses universitaires de nancy) n.p. pb
William Scammell, The Game: tennis poems (Peterloo Poets) £6.00 pb
Gloria Struthers, Sick Transit (Sinclair Stevenson) £8.95 pb
Matthew Sweeney, Cacti (Secker & Warburg) £6 pb
Wally Swist, For The Dance (Adastra Press) $8.00 pb
Martin Turner, Trespasses (Faber and Faber) £4.99 pb

John Adlard's last book The Lichfield Elegies collected quiet meditations on the relations of past and present and mourned the increasingly fragmented nature of experience. Songs For Dobra, inspired by a Dalmatian legend about a 15th-century witch and her beautiful daughter, takes the argument a step further by recreating a time and place when doubts about the human condition were likely to have been considered degenerate and even heretical. Adlard clearly had a lot of fun writing the Songs and there is something tremendously pleasing and inviting about the book's simplicity:
      

An old woman has sold me
Small black, squashy grapes.
Who was that old woman?
I have never tasted such pleasure.
I think I shall never see that old woman
again.
(21)


Adlard's last book yearned for 'cordial, unfashionable songs': here he has supplied them himself and once again I thoroughly enjoyed being in the company of the generous and civilized mind that produced them. The Whiteness of Her Becoming collects poems from 1966-91 to give us a body of work which Jon Silkin's introduction calls 'idiosyncratic' and 'in the best sense, eccentric'. These seem appropriate adjectives to apply to a poet whose major influences have been Bunting, Heath-Stubbs and the poets loosely grouped around J.H. Prynne. Silkin is right to identify 'Mrs James' and 'Against War', a translation of Tibullus, as standout pieces but the rest of the book is a disappointment. ...


Searching, please wait... animated waiting image